Tallinn’s Old Town has the best-preserved medieval buildings in Northern Europe. Even its forts with the town wall and towers are well well-preserved. It’s the it-city for medieval period lovers.

Medieval: gabled facades.

Medieval: gabled facades. The upper storey was used to store merchandise. The house I grew up in the Philippines has a gable, where we store old things.

This passageway is called Short Leg. In the middle ages, coppersmiths and locksmiths had their shops there.

This passageway is called Short Leg. In the middle ages, coppersmiths and locksmiths had their shops there.

Now here’s a little of what I learned about Tallinn’s history:

  • In the medieval period (5th-15th century) it was an important trade center.
  • The danes conquered Tallinn in the 11th century, then sold it to Germany  a century later. It flourished in the 14th and 15th century and became a leading member of the hanseatic league, a confederation of merchant guilds.
  • In the 18th century, it went under Russian rule and eventually became a summer resort for wealthy Russians in the 19th century.
Saiakang alley, a narrow medieval street. There are lots of narrow passageways and streets in this medieval city.

Saiakang alley. Medieval streets are narrow.

Notre Dame in Paris has gargoyles. Tallinn's town hall has dragonhead waterspouts.

Notre Dame in Paris has gargoyles. Tallinn’s town hall has dragonhead waterspouts.

St Catherine's Passageway, where there are many art and crafts shop. Aunt got crazy about wooden spoons.

St Catherine’s Passageway, where there are many art and crafts shop. Aunt got crazy about wooden spoons.

Medieval towers are famous symbols of Tallinn’s history. We went up a tower and walked a part of the old town wall. Check this link: “Walked on one of Tallinn’s oldest walls.”

Another “medieval experience” in Tallinn was dining in the medieval restaurant, Olde Hansa. Check this link: “Ate a la medieval nobility.”