(More pics in the photo gallery above. Just click the side arrows.)

We all wanted to see the KGB museum in Tallinn, but the women (that’s moi, aunt and cousin) prioritized the hunt for amber and to replace a present, an antique watch, so we skipped KGB museum. Instead, we drove to the Estonian Open-Air Museum outside the city centre.

This old lady is unforgettable hospitable.

This old lady is unforgettably hospitable. She helped us summon the sheep so Tuwa could feed them.

Thatched barn.

Thatched barn.

I wasn’t so interested, considering that Stockholm, Sweden (where we live) after all has Skansken – the first open-air museum in the world. But then again, extra knowledge and experience isn’t a bad thing.

Smithy from north Estonia. Built with loosely stacked limestone slabs.

Smithy from north Estonia. Built with loosely stacked limestone slabs.

At the Estonian Open-Air Museum, we got the idea of how rural life in Estonia could be.

Barley cake. Barley is a poor man's food in the medieval ages. And we have never eaten barley cake in Sweden.

Barley cake. Barley is a poor man’s food in the medieval period.

The museum is a huge village with historic rural buildings from all around the country.  Houses from the 18th to the 20th century.

I will always remember the ginger jam.

I will always remember the onion jam. Although I do wonder if I remember it right.

We saw wooden windmills, thatched barns, farmsteads and outbuildings.

Cousin tried the stilts - for kids :-) But she did a good job! I couldn't manage kids' stilts myself.

Cousin tried the stilts – for kids 🙂 But she did a good job! I couldn’t manage kids’ stilts myself.

There were several activities . like horse and carriage rides – but we skipped them all. We lacked time. And this time, we prioritized food.

The interior of Härjapea dwelling year 1939. Six people lived here. The living room demonstrated wealth.

The interior of Härjapea dwelling year 1939. Six people lived here. The living room demonstrated wealth – that was the trend of the time. But isn’t that always the trend ever – for the rich and the wanna-be rich?

There was a restaurant and there we ate food that were eaten by medieval poor peasants – like barley, oat and rye.

Lesku, or stove bench, is a Russian building tradition.

Lesku, or stove bench, is a Russian building tradition. Yup, that was necessary in Russia.

It’s fun! I mean first we ate like the medieval nobility at Olde Hanse. Then at the open-air museum we ate like poor peasants!

The store

The store

A postmill - it can be turned to catch the wind. Windmills were spread in Europe after the crusades, according to this homepage: http://www.madehow.com/Volume-7/Windmill.html

A postmill – it can be turned to catch the wind. Windmills were spread in Europe after the crusades, according to this homepage: http://www.madehow.com/Volume-7/Windmill.html

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I wonder if this is a smock mill?